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NEW! Legal news headlines from JURIST's Paper Chase are now available free for legal, .edu, .gov and .org websites. For information and instructions, click here.

Friday, October 3

Justice Department requests documents related to leak probe
Ryan DeMotte at 2:32 PM

UPI reports that the Justice Department has asked White House staffers to provide all documents related to its investigation into the leak of the name of a CIA operative. White House staffers must turn over any materials relating to U.S Ambassador Joseph Wilson and his wife or contacts with reporters. AP has this report.
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FBI investigating jury awards in Mississippi
Ryan DeMotte at 2:00 PM

CNN.com reports that the FBI is investigating irregularities in the selection of plaintiffs and juries in several large cases involving the pharmacuetical industry.
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Wisconsin appeals court refuses to delay recall election for state senator
Ryan DeMotte at 1:14 PM

AP reports that a Wisconsin appeals court has refused to delay the recall election for Democratic state senator Gary George. The primary is scheduled for Oct. 21, with the general election slated for Nov. 18.
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This day at law - Immigration and Nationality Act becomes law
Matthew Beam at 9:34 AM

On October 3, 1965, President Johnson, standing in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor, signed the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. It ordered elimination of the national origins quota system in favor of a worldwide quota blind to national origin. Immigration was redistributed by pooling unused quotas and making them available on a first-come, first-served basis to oversubscribed nations. Learn more about U.S. immigration policies and attempts to reform immigration law.
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Thursday, October 2

Judge bars prosecutors from seeking death penalty for Moussaoui
Adam Henry at 4:48 PM

A federal judge has barred U.S. prosecutors from seeking the death penalty for Zacarias Moussaoui and has prohibited the use of evidence linking him to terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema made the prohibitions as sanctions against the government for refusing Moussaoui access to other accused detainees who might have exculpated him from an alleged conspiracy to commit terrorism. See the text of the court's memorandum opinion and order.
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Law school professors and students sue Department of Defense
Adam Henry at 4:16 PM

A group of professors and students at the University of Pennsylvania Law School have sued the U.S. Department of Defense in federal district court, seeking recognition that they have complied with the 1996 Solomon Amendment, or in the alternate, that the amendment violates the constitutional right to free speech. The amendment in question requires universities that accept federal funding to allow military recruiters on their campuses. Penn Law granted military recruiters direct access to students, but withheld its services as an intermediary between the two in order to honor its policy against discrimination based on sexual orientation. Today's Legal Intelligencer offers a fuller account of the suit here.
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House passes prohibition on partial-birth abortion
Adam Henry at 3:22 PM

AP reports that the U.S. House of Representatives has passed a final version of a bill that prohibits the procedure known as partial-birth abortion. The bill must now secure the passage of the U.S. Senate and the signature of President Bush before becoming law. However, it then faces almost certain legal challenge, as the ACLU has already promised to contest the bill's constitutionality. If the Partial-Birth Abortion Act of 2003 survives these hurdles, it will enact the first criminalization of an act of abortion since Roe v. Wade was decided in 1973. The text of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 may be found here.
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Latest on investigation into leak of CIA agent's name
Adam Henry at 2:32 PM

This is Adam Henry at the JURIST anchor desk. AP reports that investigation into the recent leak of a CIA agent's name will likely broaden from the White House and CIA to also include the Departments of State and Defense. The Justice Department has appointed a prosecutor from its ranks to oversee the investigation, and the FBI has assembled a team of agents to handle the work. A new poll, however, reveals popular support for an independent special counsel to lead the effort. Nearly seven in 10 Americans support the idea. Full results of the ABCNEWS/Washington Post poll may be reviewed here.
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UN announces Anti-Corruption Treaty
Timothy Lyon at 1:35 PM

The Secretary General of UN has announced that the international organization has finalized a treaty titled the UN Convention Against Corruption. U.N. officials believe that the treaty will:
allow countries to combat corruption following standardized rules. It will provide norms of conduct for public officials, guidelines for greater transparency based on public access to information and stricter regulations against money laundering. It will also include a provision on the return of assets obtained through bribery and embezzlement to the country of origin.
Governments will have their first opportunity to sign the treaty in Mexico, December 9-11, 2003. The full story may be found here.

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Pickering wins Judiciary Committee approval
Timothy Lyon at 1:11 PM

In a developing story on JURIST, the Senate Judiciary Committee has approved the nomination of U.S. District Judge Charles Pickering. Senate Democrats, however, threaten to filibuster his nomination.
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Senate judiciary panel likely to OK Pickering
Timothy Lyon at 12:20 PM

This is Tim Lyon at the JURIST anchor desk. The AP reports that the Senate Judiciary Committee will likely approve Bush nominee Charles Pickering in a vote today, moving him one step closer to the federal appellate bench. A U.S. Department of Justice profile of Pickering can be found here. The Judiciary Committee's statement regarding Pickering's nomination is also available.
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This day at law - Thurgood Marshall sworn in
Matthew Beam at 9:18 AM

On October 2, 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first African-American on the United States Supreme Court. He served on the Court until he retired in 1991, ending his prestigious career.
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Wednesday, October 1

Letters detail dispute between Yale Law, military
Matthew Shames at 4:20 PM

The Yale Daily News reports on an exchange of letters between Yale Law School and Pentagon officials dating back to 1984. The letters provide details of the long and heated debate regarding military recruiting visits on campus. In other law school news, the Georgia State Signal reports on a new dual degree program being offered by the Georgia Institute of Technology and Georgia State University's College of Law that helps city planners earn law degrees in just four years.
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UK women lose battle to have embryos implanted against partners' consent
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 3:45 PM

A UK court ruled Wednesday that two British women who wanted to use their frozen embryos in an attempt to get pregnant could not, under current legislation, do so against the wishes of their ex-partners. The BBC has more. The ruling is not yet available online, but the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, the government body that regulates and inspects all UK clinics providing IVF, has welcomed the decision in a press release. The UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 (Schedule 3) states “An embryo the creation of which was brought about in vitro must not be kept in storage unless there is an effective consent, by each person whose gametes were used to bring about the creation of the embryo, to the storage of the embryo and the embryo is stored in accordance with those consents”.
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Former Iran/Contra prosecutor calls for special counsel to probe CIA leak
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 3:32 PM

Former Iran/Contra Associate Independent Counsel Sandra Jordan, now a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh, has called upon Attorney General John Ashcroft to appoint a special counsel to fairly and publicly investigate allegations that White House personnel leaked the classified identity of an undercover CIA operative to journalists. Read her JURIST Forum op-ed here.
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House committee approves contact lens-friendly legislation
Justine Stefanelli at 2:26 PM

Today the House Energy and Commerce Committee approved bill H.R. 3140, legislation that requires eye doctors and optometrists to give patients a copy of their prescriptions. The bill is intended to aid the millions of Americans who wear contact lenses but do not receive the same privileges as those who wear eyeglasses. The measure is also designed to lessen the conflict between eye doctors and third-party contact lens sellers. Proponents of the bill hope for a House vote within the next couple of weeks. AP has a story here.
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EU takes France to court
Justine Stefanelli at 1:41 PM

The EU Commission announced today that it will take France to court to recover the $520 million it provided in state aid to a computer company. According to EU legislation on state aid, state governments can only help companies once a decade. The EU is targeting France because in both 2001 and 2002, France saved the same company with a loan. The full story is available here.
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Colorado official promotes jury nullification
Justine Stefanelli at 1:14 PM

As reported by the Denver Post, a Jefferson County, Colorado, Treasurer is handing out booklets promoting jury nullification. The booklets support the idea that the jury has a responsibility to decide not only guilt or innocence, but also whether the law mirrors the law of God.
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China relaxes marriage laws
Justine Stefanelli at 12:45 PM

This is Justine Stefanelli at the JURIST anchor desk. New Chinese laws on marriage take effect today, according to this BBC report. With just an ID card and residency papers, couples no longer need to obtain permission from their workplaces before they tie the knot. Although the new law continues to ban gay marriage, this is a step toward a much less bureaucratic and time-consuming method. A text of the old Marriage Laws, approved in 1981, is available here.
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Work on international cloning treaty resumes
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 11:00 AM

A United Nations committee has resumed work on an international treaty to ban the cloning of human beings, taking up an initiative that stalled last year. On some of the issues involved, review Protecting the Endangered Human: Toward an International Treaty Prohibiting Cloning and Inheritable Alterations[PDF], an article by Boston University law professor George Annas and others, published last year in the American Journal of Law & Medicine.
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Justice Department investigation and reporter's privilege
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 10:52 AM

Editor & Publisher carries this AP story on media organizations' preparation to oppose any efforts by the Justice Department to subpoena journalists and their notes to learn who leaked the identity of an undercover CIA agent to columnist Robert Novak. The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press offers a guide to reporter's privilege -- "the right not to be compelled to testify or disclose sources and information in court" -- as that applies in each US state and federal circuit.
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ACLU previews new Supreme Court Term
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 10:03 AM

Could the new Supreme Court Term that starts next Monday bring "seismic shifts" to American politics and post-9/11 criminal law? The American Civil Liberties Union thinks it might, and offers this preview of cases coming before the Court. Meanwhile, Legal Times columnist Tony Mauro offers a perspective on the 10 cases granted cert by the Court yesterday.
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White House statement on DOJ investigation of CIA leak
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 8:44 AM

The White House has posted a transcript of President Bush's remarks yesterday following the announcement that the Justice Department is launching a full criminal investigation into allegations that White House officials leaked the name of a CIA operative to journalists:
Let me just say something about leaks in Washington. There are too many leaks of classified information in Washington. There's leaks at the executive branch; there's leaks in the legislative branch. There's just too many leaks. And if there is a leak out of my administration, I want to know who it is. And if the person has violated law, the person will be taken care of.

And so I welcome the investigation. I -- I'm absolutely confident that the Justice Department will do a very good job. There's a special division of career Justice Department officials who are tasked with doing this kind of work; they have done this kind of work before in Washington this year. I have told our administration, people in my administration to be fully cooperative.

I want to know the truth. If anybody has got any information inside our administration or outside our administration, it would be helpful if they came forward with the information so we can find out whether or not these allegations are true and get on about the business.
Read the President's complete statement here.

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Schedule
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 7:43 AM

Pitt Law 2L Justine Stefanelli will be making her debut at the JURIST anchor desk at 12 Noon ET today. Tomorrow, Tim Lyon returns from 12-2, and 2L Adam Henry takes the center seat from 2-5. The week rounds out with Ryan DeMotte, formerly JURIST's Judicial News editor, sitting in from 1-3 on Friday. Stay tuned!
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This day at law - Birthday of Chief Justice Rehnquist
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 7:41 AM

United States Chief Justice William Rehnquist was born in Milwaukee,
Wisconsin on October 1, 1924. Listen to remarks by President Ronald Reagan at the swearing-in ceremony for Chief Justice Rehnquist (joined by new Associate Justice Antonin Scalia) in 1986 (via the History Channel).

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Tuesday, September 30

Florida Supreme Court sets aside DNA deadline
Jeannie Shawl at 4:34 PM

In response to an emergency petition the Florida Supreme Court today issued a court order that sets aside an Oct. 1 deadline for convicts to request DNA testing that could prove their innocence, established by Florida Rule of Criminal Procedure 3.853(d)(1)(a). The deadline has been suspended so that the Court can consider the inmates' challenge to rule's constitutionality. A list of briefs filed in this case can be found here.
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Senate confirms Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals judge
Jeannie Shawl at 3:36 PM

This is Jeannie Shawl at the JURIST anchor desk. The United States Senate has confirmed San Francisco Superior Court Judge Carlos T. Bea to serve on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Ninth Circuit's press release can be found here[PDF].
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Michigan lowers legal blood alcohol limit
Matt Jacobs at 2:53 PM

A new Michigan law takes effect today, lowering the legal blood alcohol limit from .10 to .08, the DetroitNow News reports. Michigan becomes the 44th state to lower this legal limit. View the new legislation here. Under the law, the penalty for drunk driving can be up to a $500 fine and 180 hours of community service.
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UN report says Israel's counter-terror actions violate human rights
Matt Jacobs at 1:48 PM

This is Matt Jacobs at the JURIST anchor desk. The UN has released a report examining the lawfulness of Israel's counter-terrorism actions. The report, made by the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights for the Occupied Palestinian Territory, says that Israel's use of force is not an appropriate response to threats of terrorism. Read the full report here. The Rapporteur characterizes Israel's actions as amounting to "de facto annexation," which would be unlawful under the Charter of the United Nations, and the Fourth Geneva Convention.
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US Supreme Court certiorari grants
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 12:41 PM

The US Supreme Court this morning granted leave to appeal in 10 cases, including one that might affect death row sentences in Pennsylvania. Review the full list here[PDF]. For details of all the grants, see recent postings on SCOTUSBlog, from DC Supreme Court litigators Goldstein & Howe.
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Supreme Court asked to end secret arrests
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 12:31 PM

Objecting to the practice of "secret arrest," New York-based monitoring group Human Rights Watch and other civil, immigrant and human rights organizations announced Tuesday that they have asked the US Supreme Court to overturn a June decision by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruling that the US Justice Department did not have to release the names of over 1,000 people arrested in the United States following the September 11 attacks. Review Center for National Security Studies v. Ashcroft[PDF]
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Laws against leaking the names of CIA operatives
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 12:09 PM

Bernard Hibbitts back at the JURIST anchor desk again, taking over from Tim Lyon. Former Nixon White House Counsel John Dean discussed the legislation laying down penalties for leaking the name of a CIA operative in this FindLaw column from August 15, calling the strategy a "worse-than-Nixonian tactic." Citing Article 42 of the Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982, Senator Charles Schumer called for an investigation of the alleged White House leaks in a letter to FBI Director Robert Mueller on July 24. The Washington Post offers an analysis of the 1982 statute here.
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Justice Department to investigate leak of CIA agent's identity
Timothy Lyon at 10:38 AM

In a developing story on JURIST, the Washington Post reports that the Justice Department has opened a full investigation into whether the White House was involved in leaking a CIA operative's name to the media. A chronology of events is also available.
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Cost of filing a federal appeal increases
Timothy Lyon at 10:15 AM

The Judicial Conference of the United States has announced that, pursuant to statute, the cost of filing an appeal to a US Circuit Court of Appeals will increase from $105 to $255 effective November 1, 2003.
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FBI arrests Guantanamo translator
Timothy Lyon at 9:31 AM

This is Tim Lyon at the JURIST anchor desk. CNN reports that the FBI has arrested Ahmed Melhalba, a civilian translator who worked with U.S. military in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Melhalba is the third man with ties to Guantanamo Bay to be arrested for possible espionage in the past two weeks. Officials are seeking to determine whether the three men - Melhalba, James Yee, and Ahmad al Halabi- are part of a conspiracy.
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Today's schedule
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 8:13 AM

Three new law student anchors make their debuts on JURIST's Paper Chase today - from 9-11 Timothy Lyon takes the center seat, from 1-3 it's Matthew Jacobs, and from 3-5 Jeannie Shawl takes over. All are second-years at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As usual, stay tuned!
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This day at law - First execution in the American colonies
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 8:09 AM

On this day in 1630, John Billington was hanged for murder in Plymouth, Massachusetts, becoming the first person executed in the American colonies.
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Monday, September 29

Criminalizing "driving while drowsy"
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 4:19 PM

AP reports on "Maggie's Law", recent New Jersey legislation allowing prosecutors to charge a motorist with vehicular homicide if there is evidence that a deadly crash was caused by sleepiness. The legislation, the first of its kind in the US, was named after Maggie McDonnell, a 20-year-old New Jersey college student who was killed when a driver who had been awake for 30 hours crossed three lanes of highway traffic and hit her car head on. The National Sleep Foundation provides a background press release and advice on preventing drowsy driving.
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FBI arrests US Muslim leader
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 4:05 PM

The FBI announced Monday that it has arrested Abdul Rahman al-Amoudi, one of the founders of a group called the American Muslim Armed Forces and Veteran Affairs Council and a board member of the Washington, D.C.-based American Muslim Council. More from Reuters. Al Jazeera provides an Arab perspective on the arrest here. FBI Director Robert Mueller addressed the annual meeting of the American Muslim Council in Alexandria, Virginia, in June 2002. Review the text of his remarks.
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FCC will enforce Do-Not-Call Registry
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 3:53 PM

This is Bernard Hibbitts at the JURIST anchor desk again. Despite recent wrangling over the legality of the Federal Trade Commission's Do-Not-Call initiative, the Federal Communications Commission announced Monday that it will enforce the National Do-Not-Call-Registry beginning October 1. Read the FCC press release[PDF]. President Bush signed the legislation formally authorizing the Registry at a White House ceremony earlier this afternoon. Federal Trade Commission Chairman Tim Muris will discuss the Do-Not-Call Registry live on the White House website today at 4pm.
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FBI looking into White House leak of CIA agent's identity
genevieve nolan at 1:35 PM

This is Jen Nolan at the JURIST anchor desk. According to an unnamed senior administration official, the FBI is looking into whether any laws were violated when the name of an undercover CIA agent was allegedly leaked by Bush administration officials to journalists earlier this year, and if a criminal investigation should be commenced. Columnist Robert Novak originally identified Valerie Plame, wife of retired diplomat Joseph C. Wilson, as a CIA operative in a July 2003 column. For more, see Deb Riechmann's AP story. The leak was the subject of vigorous questioning at Monday's White House press briefing, recorded video of which is available here. Under the Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982, unauthorized disclosure of classified information about a covert agent constitutes a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine as high as $50,000.
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State courts funding crisis
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 12:40 PM

Funding to state courts in New Hampshire and Oregon is now being restored, but courts in Ohio, Alabama and many other jurisdictions across the country are still trying to deal with delays and service reductions forced by state budget cuts and shortfalls in the past two years. Seth Stern has more in today's Christian Science Monitor. Further information about the state court funding crisis is available from the National Center for State Courts.
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Koh favorite for dean at Yale Law School
Matthew Shames at 12:09 PM

This is Matt Shames with today's law school news. The Yale Daily News reports that international law professor Harold Koh has emerged as the favored candidate to succeed Yale Law School Dean Anthony Kronman, who is stepping down when his second term ends this spring. Elsewhere, the Crimson reports on the growing feud between Harvard Law School professor Alan Dershowitz and DePaul University political science professor Norman Finkelstein. Finkelstein has accused Dershowitz of plagiarism in the law professor's latest book.
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Death penalty perspectives - live webcast
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 12:07 PM

At the University of Cincinnati College of Law this afternoon, three speakers, each of whom has had a family member murdered, talk about how they came to oppose the death penalty. The event is sponsored by the UC Center for Law & Justice
and the Criminal Law Association. Watch a live webcast beginning at 12:15 PM ET.

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First treaty against globalized crime enters into force
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 10:53 AM

The United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, described as "the first legally binding treaty to fight crime on a worldwide scale in response to the growing globalization of criminal gangs", entered into force Monday. The accord requires states party to cooperate on criminal control issues ranging from money laundering to human trafficking. More from the UN Office on Drugs and Crime.
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North Dakota AG says law school clinic can sue Fargo over Ten Commandments
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 10:26 AM

In the wake of a complaint by a state legislator and representations by the Association of American Law Schools and the Clinical Legal Education Association, North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem ruled Friday that the taxpayer-supported law clinic at the University of North Dakota School of Law can legally represent private citizens in a lawsuit against the city of Fargo over the placement of a Ten Commandments monument on Fargo's City Hall plaza. The Grand Forks Herald has more. The Attorney General wrote:
The State Board of Higher Education has chosen to provide for a School of Law at the University of North Dakota. Within the School of Law, a legal clinic has been established for the purpose of educating law students and giving them experience with the practical aspects of a legal practice, including representation of actual clients. The ABA Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility, in an opinion on “Limitations on the Operation of a Legal Clinic by a College of Law,” stated that governing bodies of state law school legal clinics should seek to avoid making rules “that prohibit acceptance of controversial clients and cases or that prohibit acceptance of cases aligning the legal aid clinic against public officials, government agencies or influential members of the community.” ABA Informal Op. 1208, Feb. 9, 1972. Further, the North Dakota Rules of Professional Conduct support the principle that controversial or unpopular clients should not be denied legal representation. N.D. R. Prof. Conduct 1.2, comment. In determining the type of cases to handle, the legal clinic has not elected to decline cases against the state or its political subdivisions. I have not found anything in the North Dakota Constitution or laws that would require the clinic to decline such cases.
Read the full Opinion[PDF].

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Pledge, fetal rights cases among those considered by Supreme Court
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 9:49 AM

The US Supreme Court meets in conference today to consider more than 2000 appeals filed with it over the summer, reports David Savage in the LA Times. Among the cases under consideration is one involving a parent's efforts to have the phrase "under God" removed from the Pledge of Alliegience recited in public schools. In another, highlighted by Shania Jones in the Washington Legal Times, the Court has been asked to determine whether a mother whose stillborn baby tested positive for cocaine can be convicted of murder.
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This day at law - First Congressional invocation of War Powers Act
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 9:24 AM

On September 29, 1983, Congress invoked the War Powers Act for the first time, authorizing President Reagan to keep U.S. Marines in Lebanon another 18 months.
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Changes to The Paper Chase
Prof. Bernard Hibbitts at 8:47 AM

Good morning - this is Bernard Hibbitts, the Director of JURIST. Beginning today, dedicated readers of The Paper Chase will begin to see some changes to this weblog as we implement the first of a series of major enhancements to JURIST as a whole. The site upgrade, which is both substantive and technical, will be "rolled out" gradually over the next two months as we test new structures and features.

At 1 PM this afternoon Eastern Time I'll be joined by the first of our new team of "anchors" - all second-year law students here at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law (you'll find their names on the right-hand side of this page) - who'll help me keep you posted on important legal news and resources. Additional anchors will make their debuts through the week. Together we'll be able to provide broader and better coverage of key legal developments, while the students themselves will get a unique opportunity to learn law as it happens, in real time, and pass the benefit of their information and research directly on to JURIST readers across the country and around the world.

Stay tuned!

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CHECK THE PAPER CHASE ARCHIVE

PAPER CHASE STAFF

Anchors
Anchors for JURIST's Paper Chase take rotating online shifts through the week, researching and reporting breaking legal news and other interesting law-related stories as they happen.

  • Adam Henry is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He is also JURIST's Law School News Editor. Adam holds an AB in Politics from Princeton University.
  • Bernard Hibbitts is the founder and Director of JURIST, and a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.
  • Jeannie Shawl is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. She is also JURIST's International Law Editor. Jeannie holds a BA in Government from the College of William & Mary.
  • Jen Nolan is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. She is also JURIST's Civil Rights Editor. Jen holds a BA in Sociology and Political Science from the University of Illinois.
  • Justine Stefanelli is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. She is also JURIST's Department of Justice News Editor. Justine holds a BS in Psychology from Duquesne University.
  • Matthew Jacobs is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He is also JURIST's Cyberspace Law Editor. Matt holds a BS in Physics from Carnegie Mellon University.
  • Ryan DeMotte is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. Ryan holds a BA in Economics from Grove City College.
  • Timothy Lyon is a 2L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He is also JURIST's Criminal Law and Punishment Editor. Tim holds a BA in History from the University of Pittsburgh.

Reporters
Reporters for JURIST's Paper Chase file regular reports on the latest legal developments in a specific subject-area.



LEGAL NEWS WORTH THINKING ABOUT...
Researched and reported by Professor Bernard Hibbitts and law students at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law


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