Conferences and Funding Opportunities

Broader funding opportunities for the entire University of Pittsburgh are provided here.

Call For Abstracts
Loyola University Chicago School of Law Wiet Life Science Law Scholars Conference

Friday, October 6, 2017, 9 AM - 5 PM, Chicago

Loyola University Chicago's nationally acclaimed Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy is pleased to invite original research submissions for its inaugural Wiet Life Science Law Scholars Conference on Friday, October 6, 2017.

The conference is designed to provide a new intellectual venue for life science professors, scholars, and practitioners to convene and discuss current research and scholarship. The phrase "life science law" aims to capture research and disciplines spanning food and drug law, health law, intellectual property (IP), biotechnology, environmental, administrative, antitrust, and other realms that involve the life sciences in some meaningful respect. Our goal is to foster recognition of life science law as a cohesive, dynamic, area of legal study and strengthen connections among national life science law scholars.

Loyola is currently soliciting 750-1,000 word abstracts reflecting early or mid-stage ideas for the purpose of workshopping with other conference scholars. Modeled after successful events for law professors and scholars in other areas, participants will be organized in topical panels of three to five authors with approximately 15-20 minutes allotted to each abstract presentation, followed by discussions with scholar attendees. Abstracts from the authors will be distributed one week prior to the conference; authors may also submit draft articles for distribution to conference attendees.

SUBMISSION AND REVIEW TIMELINE: The deadline for 750-1,000 word abstracts, including author contact information is June 15. Submit via email to health-law@luc.edu with subject line Wiet Life Science Law.

Authors will be notified of speaker selections by email on or before July 15.

COST: This extraordinary conference has been generously funded by Loyola University Chicago law alumnus Mitch Wiet (JD '65) and his family. Admission to the conference, including a one-night stay at a local Chicago hotel, meals, and a reception following the conference, is free. (Conference attendees must pay their own travel.)

FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact Professors Jordan Paradise jparadise@luc.edu or Cynthia Ho cho@luc.edu with questions about conference scope and abstract submissions. For logistical questions, please contact Janet Howe at health-law@luc.edu

ABOUT THE BEAZLEY INSTITUTE: Established in 1984, Loyola's Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy has evolved into a nationally recognized center dedicated to the education of health and life science law leaders and policymakers, and to the study and furtherance of the field. The Institute publishes two journals - the Annals of Health Law and the Loyola University Chicago Journal of Regulatory Compliance - and offers more than thirty health law, life science law, and compliance courses. The Beazley Institute is a leader in online legal education, with more than 300 students annually taking courses through its Center for Online Studies. With the offering of the Wiet Life Science Law Scholars Conference, the expansion of Loyola's life science curriculum, and dedicated externship opportunities for students, the Beazley Institute looks forward to collaborating with our scholar colleagues to support the burgeoning discipline of life science law.

Call for Papers : Law’s Porosities

The North-American section of the Société de législation comparée is organizing a bilingual conference (French-English) on “Law’s Porosities” on October 26, 2017 in Washington, D.C. at the American University Washington College of Law, in conjunction with the American Society of Comparative Law’s annual meeting, which will be held on October 27 and 28, 2017. Presentations in English or French are welcome.

There is no cost to attend either or both meetings, and reduced hotel costs will be available to anyone registered for either or both meetings.

Please send a short abstract of your proposed presentation before August 31 to VivianeCurran@pitt.edu.

Details for registration will be posted soon on the site of the American Society of Comparative Law: http://ascl.org/

We are hoping to see many of you in Washington!

-Vivian Curran, President, North-American Section, Société de législation comparée,
President, American Society of Comparative Law

-George Bermann, Vice-President, North-American Section, Société de législation comparée

Ford Institute for Human Security Research Grant Competition

The Ford Institute for Human Security seeks to promote high quality research and writing in the field of human security. To that end, we encourage the submission of proposals to the annual competition for full-time or core non-tenured faculty to apply for up to $2,000 to support research and publication on a human security topic.

For more information, view the flyer (PDF).

Pitt Faculty Research Retreat

May 5-6, 2017
Seven Springs Conference Center

More information and the application for this retreat can be found here

The deadline to submit an application is Friday, April 21 at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Center for Research & Policy Analysis Invites Applications for Legal Education Diversity Pipeline Grants

February 16, 2017
Deadline: April 10, 2017 (Letters of Inquiry)

The Access Group Center for Research & Policy Analysis conducts research and provides grants that address some of the most critical issues facing legal education today, including enhancing access to legal education for students from diverse backgrounds; increasing the affordability and financing options for students pursuing legal education; and expanding the value and relevance of legal education.

To that end, the center's Legal Education Diversity Pipeline Grant Program awards grants of up to $125,000 to current or proposed programs that conduct effective interventions to enhance access to legal education for students from diverse backgrounds, specifically historically under-represented minority students and students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Projects should address the issue of enhanced access to legal education, at the national level, or encompass more localized efforts that might be efficiently scaled across institutions and regions for greater impact. Applications from programs that display a collaborative approach and strong partnerships with other organizations to achieve the goal of enhancing access to legal education are encouraged.

CRPA will begin accepting letters of Inquiry on March 1, 2017. LOIs must be received no later than April 10, 2017. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit full applications by June 30, 2017.

See the CRPA website for complete program guidelines, an informational webinar, and application procedures.

Link to Complete RFP

Access Group is currently accepting applications for the January 2017 cycle of its Unsolicited Grants Program

The Unsolicited Grants Program allows the Center to become aware of, and fund, new and innovative projects and research that further the Center priorities of access, affordability and the value of legal education.

Read more here.

International Collaborations on Sustainable Innovations Grant

This alliance between UCIS and the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation (MCSI), with financial support from the Provost’s office, represents an innovative approach to encourage interdisciplinary sustainability research, amplify Pitt’s national and international recognition in sustainability, create opportunities for enhancing research through international collaborations, and expand international partnerships grounded on strong research collaborations.

We invite faculty to submit grant proposals to support high-quality research in sustainability through international collaborations. The goal of the grant is to seed funding to develop new international collaborations that advance work in solving pressing sustainability problems.

The application deadline is February 28, 2017. For further information, please visit: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/main/content/sustainable-innovations-grant

UCIS Faculty Fellowship

We welcome applications for the UCIS Faculty Fellowship, AY 2017-2018. The UCIS Faculty Fellowship enables faculty members to undertake major projects or acquire skills that enhance the University’s capabilities in international studies. The Fellowship is awarded in close collaboration between UCIS, the faculty member, and his/her dean and department chair. UCIS provides replacement costs for the faculty and provides a limited research fund for use during the Faculty Fellowship. The Fellowship does not interrupt the accrual of terms toward a sabbatical.

Application deadline: January 20, 2017

Please visit our website for further details and the application form: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/main/faculty_fellowship

Annual Comparative Law Work-in-Progress Workshop

April 28-29, 2017
UCLA School of Law

Organized by Máximo Langer (University of California at Los Angeles), Jacqueline Ross (University of Illinois College of Law), and Kim Lane Scheppele (Princeton University)

Co-sponsored by the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Illinois College of Law, Princeton University, and the American Society of Comparative Law

We invite all interested comparative law scholars to consider submitting a paper to the next annual Comparative Law Work-in-Progress Workshop, which will be held on Friday and Saturday, April 28 and 29, 2017, at UCLA School of Law.  We will accept up to seven papers for workshop discussion, and we plan to select a mix of both junior and senior scholars.

Interested authors should submit papersto Máximo Langer at UCLA School of Law langer@law.ucla.edu by February 1, 2017.  We will inform authors of our decision by March 1, 2017. Participants whose papers have been accepted should plan to arrive in Los Angeles, California by Thursday night on April 27, 2017, and to leave on Saturday April 29, 2017 in the late afternoon/evening. 

The annual workshop continues to be an important forum in which comparative law work in progress can be explored among colleagues in a serious and thorough manner that will be truly helpful to the respective authors. "Work in progress" means scholarship that has reached a stage at which it is substantial enough to merit serious discussion and critique but that has not yet appeared in print (and can still be revised after the workshop, if it has already been accepted for publication.)  It includes law review articles, book chapters or outlines, substantial book reviews, and other appropriate genres.

We ask for only one contribution per author and also ask authors to limit their papers to 50 pages in length, or, if the paper (or book chapter) is longer, to indicate which 50 pages they would like to have read and discussed. 

Our objective is not only to provide an opportunity for the discussion of scholarly work but also to create the opportunity for comparative lawyers to get together for two days devoted to nothing but talking shop, both in the sessions and outside. We hope that this will create synergy that fosters more dialogue, cooperation, and an increased sense of coherence for the discipline.

The participants in the workshop will consist of the respective authors, commentators, and faculty members of the host institutions. The overall group will be kept small enough to sit around a large table and to allow serious discussion. The papers will not be presented at the workshop. They will be distributed well in advance and every participant must have read them before attending the meeting.  Each paper will be introduced and discussed first by two commentators before opening the discussion to the other workshop participants. Each of the authors selected for the workshop is expected to have read and to be prepared to discuss each of the papers selected. The author of each paper will be given an opportunity to respond and ask questions of his or her own. There are no plans to publish the papers. Instead, it is up to the authors to seek publication if, and wherever, they wish. The goal of the workshop is to improve the work before publication. 

The Workshop will be funded by the host school and by the American Society of Comparative Law. Authors of papers and commentators will be reimbursed for their travel expenses and accommodation up to $600, by either by the American Society of Comparative Law orUCLA School of Law, in accordance with the ASCL reimbursement policy (as posted on its webpage.)  We ask that authors inquire into funding opportunities at their home institutions before applying for reimbursement by the ASCL or by the University of Illinois.   

Central Research Development Fund (CRDF)- FY 18 Announcement

The University of Pittsburgh Office of the Vice Provost for Research is pleased to solicit applications for Fiscal Year 2018 Small Grants Program, the Central Research Development Fund (CRDF). Interested faculty are requested to submit an expression of interest before January 13, 2017; the deadline for receipt of applications is Friday, March 3, 2017. Successful applications will receive receiving funding effective July 31, 2017.

The primary goal of the CRDF Small Grants Program is to enhance opportunities for faculty, especially early career faculty, at the University of Pittsburgh to engage in high-quality research, scholarship, and creative endeavors. The program is intended to provide funding support that cannot be obtained from other sources (including the faculty member’s department and school and external funding agencies). Small grants provide:

  • seed funding to develop ideas to the point where external funding can be obtained;
  • awards to support scholarship in areas where external funding is extremely limited.

CRDF Small Grants awards cannot be used to support or supplement faculty salaries or for travel to meetings and conferences; computer equipment is not given priority. In the past, awards have ranged from $2,000 to $16,000. The maximum that may be awarded this year is $16,000. The CRDF Small Grants Program is administered by the Office of Research and the University Research Council.

Please refer to the current CRDF policies and guidelines for detailed information about the goals of the CRDF program and eligibility requirements. Please review the application instructions carefully before preparing an application. If you have questions relating to the CRDF, please contact Mary Grace Murray, in the Office of the Vice Provost for Research (Telephone: 412-624-9019; E-mail: mgwojnar@pitt.edu) or Ryan Champagne, in the Office of Research (Telephone: 412.624.7410; Email: rkc12@pitt.edu)

Access Group Invites Proposals For $50,000 Grants For Legal Education Research

The Access Group Center for Research & Policy Analysis, in partnership with the Association for Institutional Research(AIR), is excited to announce the 2016 Research and Dissertation Fellows Program. The Fellows program is a grant competition promoting scholarship on issues related to access, affordability and value of legal education specifically, and graduate and professional education more broadly. Two types of grants are available to support year-long research projects-$50,000 Research Grants and $25,000 Doctoral Grants.

IMPORTANT DATES:
Application opens: November 7, 2016
Application deadline: December 19, 2016 (11:59 pm EST)
Decisions announced: February 2, 2017
Funding and project period begins: March 1, 2017
Project period ends: February 28, 2018

Social Science Research Initiative November 2016

The Provost’s Office announces a special initiative to expand the involvement of social scientists at Pitt in research questions that can be best addressed through interdisciplinary approaches within the social sciences or that bridge social science and other fields, or, in unusual cases, for integrative approaches than span subdisciplines of a single social science discipline. T/TS faculty in social science disciplines in the Dietrich School, Business, Education, GSPIA, Information Sciences, Law, and Social Work are eligible to apply and must serve as the lead researcher. Research collaborators may be from other schools or units at Pitt or elsewhere. Collaborations that involve junior faculty are particularly encouraged, but mid-career and senior faculty are welcome to apply.

The goal of this initiative is to expand social science research; therefore only proposals for new collaborations are eligible to apply. These can be exploratory in nature, such as efforts to establish new research collaborations by inviting external speakers, creating a working paper series, or organizing a workshop. Proposals can also be aimed at building a research team, acquiring or collecting data for publication, or preparing proposals for external funding.

Proposals can request up to $50,000; however, it is anticipated that funding requests will vary depending on the nature of the projects being proposed. Funds can be used to convene small conferences or workshops; support travel to conferences; hire a Graduate Student Assistant (GSA) to collect preliminary data, review literatures, or assist on grant preparation; pay for research expenses or research travel; or engage in other efforts likely to advance social science team research and/or strengthen applications for external funding. Proposals to hire a GSA must include current year stipend rates (http://www.pitt.edu/~graduate/stipends.html) plus 50% fringe benefits. No funds may be used for faculty salary.

Proposals should be submitted jointly by two or more faculty, at least one of which must be a social scientist as noted above. Proposals should contain a 5-page (maximum) narrative that describes the project and its promise for developing significant and/or innovative research, a 1-page detailed budget, a 1-page bibliography, current CV’s of all applicants, and a letter of support from the department chair of each applicant. Proposals from department chairs should include a letter of support from the Associate Dean for Research.

All application materials should be submitted to: Competition Space, the University’s online portal for internal research funding opportunities, by January 15, 2017. Proposals will be reviewed and awards announced in February, 2017. Funds can be expended from March 1, 2017 – May 31, 2018.

American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers (ACCFSL) 2017 Writing Competition

The American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers is pleased to announce awards to be presented for:

(a) the best book
(b) the best publishable article, book chapter, or substantial book review
(c) the best student note or comment on a topic dealing with consumer financial services law.  

The awards include cash payments of $2500, $2000, and $1000, respectively, a Certificate of Recognition from the College, and travel expenses to attend the Spring 2017 meeting of the College.  In any given year, depending on submissions, all three awards, or fewer, may be made.

Eligible entries will address a topic on consumer financial services, but not securities regulation, insurance, or the safety-and-soundness aspects of banking regulation.  Works on subjects within these (or other) areas, however, will be considered if they bear directly on consumer financial services.

Entries must have been written or published between November 15, 2015, and December 1, 2016.  The deadline for submission is December 1, 2016.  Unpublished entries should be typed, double spaced, and in law review format.  

The winners will be honored at the annual meeting of the College held in conjunction with the Spring Meeting of the Business Law Section of the American Bar Association, to be held in New Orleans in April 2017.

The American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers is a nonprofit association of attorneys who have made significant contributions to consumer financial services law over an extended period of time.  Its members include academics, present and former federal and state regulatory and enforcement officers, authors in the field, private practitioners, counsel for financial institutions and other service providers, and representatives of consumer protection and advocacy organizations.

Entries must be submitted in electronic format and should be sent to:

Richard P. Hackett, ACCFSL Writing Competition Chair
Hudson Cook, LLP
22 Free Street. Suite 205
Portland, Maine 04101
rhackett@hudco.com

More information on the College may be found at:   http://www.accfsl.org

The Supreme Court, Politics and Reform

The 2017 Pepperdine Law Review Symposium
Malibu, California—April 8, 2017

Announcement and Call for Proposals

Next April, the Pepperdine Law Review will hold its annual symposium on the question of whether the political deadlock over the Merrick Garland nomination provides a stark indication the U.S. Supreme Court has become an unduly political institution, and, if so, what internal and external reforms might address this problem.  We invite all interested scholars to submit a relevant proposal to present at the symposium and be considered for publication in a special edition of our law review.

Confirmed lead commentators include:

  • Akhil Amar (Yale)
  • Erwin Chemerinsky (UC Irvine)
  • Michael McConnell (Stanford)
  • Hon. Richard Posner (by teleconference)
  • Mark Tushnet (Harvard)

Speaking slots are limited and proposals will be selected on the basis of, among other things, how well they facilitate comprehensive coverage of the questions to be examined. Where proposals identify problems, those that also explore specific reform measures will be accorded additional weight.  Selected speakers will present their ideas in breakout panel sessions, and are requested to submit papers for potential publication. However, due to space and resource constraints, not all papers will be selected. Except for meals provided at the symposium, speakers are expected to cover their own expenses of attending and make their own travel and lodging arrangements. Symposium staff will be available to make lodging recommendations and assist with other logistics.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please do so by Friday, November 11, 2016. Proposals and accompanying biographies should be no longer than one page each. They should be submitted to Sophia Sipsas at sophia.sipsas@pepperdine.edu. For questions about the conference, you may contact our events manager Suzanne Inman at suzanne.inman@pepperdine.edu. 

Annual Comparative Law Work-in-Progress Workshop

Organized by Máximo Langer (University of California at Los Angeles), Jacqueline Ross (University of Illinois College of Law), and Kim Lane Scheppele (Princeton University)
Co-sponsored by the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Illinois College of Law, Princeton University, and the American Society of Comparative Law

We invite all interested comparative law scholars to consider submitting a paper to the next annual Comparative Law Work-in-Progress Workshop, which will be held on Friday and Saturday, April 28 and 29, 2017, at UCLA School of Law.  We will accept up to seven papers for workshop discussion, and we plan to select a mix of both junior and senior scholars.

Interested authors should submit papersto Máximo Langer at UCLA School of Law langer@law.ucla.edu by February 1, 2017. We will inform authors of our decision by March 1, 2017. Participants whose papers have been accepted should plan to arrive in Los Angeles, California by Thursday night on April 27, 2017, and to leave on Saturday April 29, 2017 in the late afternoon/evening. 

The annual workshop continues to be an important forum in which comparative law work in progress can be explored among colleagues in a serious and thorough manner that will be truly helpful to the respective authors. "Work in progress" means scholarship that has reached a stage at which it is substantial enough to merit serious discussion and critique but that has not yet appeared in print (and can still be revised after the workshop, if it has already been accepted for publication.)   It includes law review articles, book chapters or outlines, substantial book reviews, and other appropriate genres.

We ask for only one contribution per author and also ask authors to limit their papers to 50 pages in length, or, if the paper (or book chapter) is longer, to indicate which 50 pages they would like to have read and discussed. 

Our objective is not only to provide an opportunity for the discussion of scholarly work but also to create the opportunity for comparative lawyers to get together for two days devoted to nothing but talking shop, both in the sessions and outside. We hope that this will create synergy that fosters more dialogue, cooperation, and an increased sense of coherence for the discipline.

The participants in the workshop will consist of the respective authors, commentators, and faculty members of the host institutions. The overall group will be kept small enough to sit around a large table and to allow serious discussion. The papers will not be presented at the workshop. They will be distributed well in advance and every participant must have read them before attending the meeting. Each paper will be introduced and discussed first by two commentators before opening the discussion to the other workshop participants. Each of the authors selected for the workshop is expected to have read and to be prepared to discuss each of the papers selected. The author of each paper will be given an opportunity to respond and ask questions of his or her own.  There are no plans to publish the papers. Instead, it is up to the authors to seek publication if, and wherever, they wish.  The goal of the workshop is to improve the work before publication. 

The Workshop will be funded by the host school and by the American Society of Comparative Law. Authors of papers and commentators will be reimbursed for their travel expenses and accommodation up to $600, by either by the American Society of Comparative Law orUCLA School of Law, in accordance with the ASCL reimbursement policy (as posted on its webpage.) We ask that authors inquire into funding opportunities at their home institutions before applying for reimbursement by the ASCL or by the University of Illinois.   

Works in Progress Conference

The works-in-progress conference will take place on February 2 and 3, 2017, at the University of Missouri School of Law. The purpose of the conference is to help authors develop draft articles for publication, so authors will be required to submit a working draft before the conference takes place. Papers will be circulated in advance of the session, and all participants will be expected to provide detailed feedback on a limited number of other papers.

The works-in-progress conference will also feature various networking opportunities as well as several substantive presentations on issues relating to international dispute resolution. Presentations will be live or by video and include:

  • Lady Justice Joyce Aluoch, Judge and First Vice-President of the International Criminal Court in the Hague, who will be speaking on matters of public international law;
  • Ryan Reetz and Pedro Martinez-Fraga of Bryan Cave, who will be speaking on their recent book, Public Purpose in International Law:  Rethinking Regulatory Sovereignty in the Global Era (Cambridge University Press 2015); and
  • Paul-Jean Le Cannu, Legal Counsel at ICSID, who will speak on the future of investor-state dispute settlement systems.

Papers presented at the works-in-progress conference will be eligible for expedited review by the University of Missouri’s highly regarded Journal of Dispute Resolution as well as for consideration by the ICSID Review-Foreign Investment Law Journal. While submissions will have to go through the normal publication process and an offer of publication is not guaranteed, the editors of both journals are very interested in reviewing submissions from works-in-progress participants.

This is expected to be a very international event, and submissions are sought from academics and practitioners around the world. Junior professionals, including aspiring and untenured academics, are encouraged to submit proposals. To be considered, potential participants must submit a one-page abstract of their work on or before October 15, 2016.  Details on how to submit a proposal for the works-in-progress conference can be found here: http://law.missouri.edu/faculty/wip-issues-in-international-dispute-resolution/conference/.

ACLARS – Law, Religion and Security

Following the success of conferences in Ghana (2013), South Africa (2014), Namibia (2015) and Ethiopia (2016), the African Consortium for Law and Religion Studies will be convening its Fifth Annual Law and Religion Conference in Rabat, Morocco from 14 to 17 May 2017 in collaboration with the International University of Rabat, and the International Center for Law and Religion Studies at J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University, USA. The subject of the conference will be Religion, Law and Security focusing on religious extremism, blasphemy, violence, and terrorism together with aspects of human security.

A copy of the Call for Papers is attached. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 30 September 2016. Abstracts to be sent by email to secretariat@aclars.org

SEALS 2017 - Call for Submissions

SEALS has begun the process of putting together its 2017 annual meeting program. According to SEALS, they aim to conclude this process by October 31st, to issue a draft program in December, and a final program in mid-January. Anyone can decide to put together a panel or discussion group and submit it through the SEALS website submission portal.

American Arbitration Association - International Centre For Dispute Resolution Foundation, Inc.

Now Accepting Initial Descriptions Of Grant Proposals For Second Funding Cycle

The AAA-ICDR Foundation is now accepting proposals for its second funding cycle. Interested organizations or individuals should submit a 1-2 page Initial Description of Grant Request no later than October 14, 2016 go to www.AAAICDRFoundation.org for process and forms.The American Arbitration Association (AAA®) and its international division, the International Centre for Dispute Resolution (ICDR®), announced the establishment of the AAA-ICDR FoundationTM in May 2015. Since that time, the Foundation Board: James R. Jenkins, India Johnson, John J. Kerr, Jr., Carolyn Lamm, Francis McGovern, Bruce Meyerson, and Board Chair Edna Sussman along with AAA/ICDR support staff have been hard at work in both the areas of grant making and fundraising. The Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, and is able to solicit donations and provide grants to fund a range of worthy causes that promote the Foundation’s wide-reaching mission, which is to support the use and improvement of dispute resolution processes in the USA and internationally, including:

  • Fostering measures that reduce potential escalation, manage, and resolve conflicts.
  • Expanding the use of dispute resolution processes tailored to the conflict.
  • Supporting research, education and initiatives promoting high quality, efficient and fair dispute resolution.
  • Increasing access to justice in and through alternative dispute resolution.
  • Encouraging collaborative processes to resolve public conflicts.
  • Sharing expertise across diverse groups and cultures.
  • Partnering with others dedicated to advancing the Foundation’s mission

For more information on the AAA-ICDR Foundation and the grant-application process, please visit www.AAAICDRFoundation.org.

Reasonable Doubt:  Epistemological Reflections on Jurors' Decision-making

University of Pittsburgh Annual Lecture Series Talk, Center for Philosophy of Science

Speaker: Marion Vorms
U. London Birkbeck College
Friday, April 22, 2016
3:30 pm, Center for Philosophy of Science
817R Cathedral of Learning (seating is limited)

Abstract: The goal of this paper is to study whether and how the notion of ‘reasonable doubt’ might be a useful concept to study belief dynamics and decision-making in general — jurors being taken as a model for everyday reasoners and decision-makers.

In Common Law systems, jurors in criminal trials are instructed to return a verdict of guilty if and only if they estimate that the evidence presented in court does not leave any reasonable doubt as to whether the defendant is guilty. Although there is no consensus about the meaning of this standard of proof in legal theory and practice, interpreting it in terms of a probabilistic threshold seems rather natural and sensible.

Taken more generally, the notion of reasonable doubt seems to be prima facie easily definable in decision-theoretic terms: whether doubt in a given hypothesis is reasonable or not (and hence whether action based on it is rational or not) seems to depend on the degree of confirmation of this hypothesis, and on a probabilistic threshold that itself depends on the decisional context (utilities). But is that all we mean when we say that a given agent’s doubting such or such hypothesis is (un)reasonable? Isn’t there more to “reasonable doubt” than the complement of “reasonable belief” — more than a probabilistic threshold for action? And don’t we need something more than degrees of belief (“outright belief”, or “acceptance”) to account for our intuitions regarding whether doubt is reasonable or not in different situations? In other words, by approaching belief revision and decision-making through the lens of reasonable doubt, are we forced to amend, or complement the Bayesian framework by another level of analysis? The goal of this talk is to tackle these issues through the analysis of different examples drawn from the judiciary, the scientific, and everyday contexts.

Center Website:  www.pitt.edu/~pittcntr
Email:  pittcntr@pitt.edu

Publication opportunity in the Chicago-Kent Law Review

The Chicago-Kent Law Review has one issue open for the 2016-2017 school year. The Chicago-Kent Law Review uses a symposium format and publishes entire issues pertaining to one subject. For each issue, they work with a panel of between 8 and 11 law professors that a symposium editor puts together. This issue would be published in February 2017, with an article submission due date of November 15, 2016. If you're looking for a publication opportunity in a prestigious law journal and you have an interest in putting together an entire issue as a symposium editor, please contact the Editor-in-Chief, Ann Motto (cklawreview@kentlaw.iit.edu) for more details.

Junior Faculty Forum to be held at Yale Law School on June 28-29, 2016

The Forum’s goal is to encourage the work of scholars recently appointed to a tenure-track position by providing experience in the pursuit of scholarship and the nature of the scholarly exchange. Meetings are held each spring, rotating among Yale, Stanford, and Harvard. Twelve to twenty scholars (with one to seven years in teaching) will be chosen on a blind basis from among those submitting papers to present. One or more senior scholars, not necessarily from Yale, Stanford, or Harvard, will comment on each paper. The audience will include the participating junior faculty, faculty from the host institutions, and invited guests. The goal is discourse both on the merits of particular papers and on appropriate methodologies for doing work in that genre.

TOPICS: Each year the Forum invites submissions on selected legal topics. For the upcoming 2016 meeting, the topics will cover the following areas of the law:

  • Administrative Law
  • Constitutional Law – theoretical foundations
  • Constitutional Law – historical foundations
  • Criminal Law
  • Critical Legal Studies
  • Environmental Law
  • Family Law
  • Jurisprudence and Philosophy
  • Law and Humanities
  • Public International Law
  • Race/Gender Studies/Antidiscrimination
  • Workplace Law and Social Welfare Policy

A jury of accomplished scholars, again not necessarily from Yale, Stanford or Harvard, with expertise in the particular topic, will choose the papers to be presented. There is no publication commitment, nor is previously published work eligible. Yale, Stanford, or Harvard will pay presenters’ and commentators’ travel expenses, though international flights may be only partially reimbursed.

QUALIFICATIONS: There is no limit on the number of submissions by any individual author. Authors who teach at a U.S. law school in a tenured or tenure-track position and have not have been teaching at either of those ranks for a total of more than seven years are eligible to submit their work. American citizens or permanent residents teaching abroad are also eligible provided that they have held a faculty position or the equivalent, including positions comparable to junior faculty positions in research institutions, for less than seven years and that they earned their last degree after 2006. We accept jointly authored submissions, but each of the coauthors must be individually eligible to participate in the Forum. Papers that will be published prior to the meeting in June 2016 are not eligible.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Electronic submissions should be sent to Katherine Pothin (katherine.pothin@yale.edu) with the subject line “Junior Faculty Forum.” The deadline for submissions is February 29, 2016. Please remove all references to the author(s) in the paper. Please include in the text of the email a cover note listing your name, the title of your paper, any coauthors, and under which topic your paper falls. Each paper may only be considered under one topic. Any questions about the submission procedure should be directed both to Christine Jolls (christine.jolls@yale.edu) and her assistant, Katherine Pothin (katherine.pothin@yale.edu).

FURTHER INFORMATION: Inquiries concerning the Forum should be sent to Gabby Blum (gblum@law.harvard.edu) or Adriaan Lanni (adlanni@law.harvard.edu) at Harvard Law School, Richard Ford (rford@stanford.edu) at Stanford Law School, or Christine Jolls (christine.jolls@yale.edu) or Yair Listokin (yair.listokin@yale.edu) at Yale Law School.

Central Research Development Funds - Fiscal Year 2017 Small Grants Program

TLW-Glossæ | Gloss Writing, Law and Critical Thought

TLW-Glossæ is an ongoing platform for gloss-writing about legal concepts in different languages, their histories and genealogies, and their different forms across cultures and languages. This CFP, or CFG ("call for glosses"), is intended to initiate the project by creating a select first set of concepts. This is a peer-reviewed project. The selected glosses will be first published in a monographic issue of Digital Philology, and then migrated to TLW-Glossæ, where they will be geolocalized and chronogrammed. Deadline for submission, Mar. 1, 2016. For more information on how to submit, visit laic.columbia.edu.

2016 First Amendment Gerrymander Standard Writing Competition

Due March 27, 2016

In December 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a unanimous ruling in Shapiro v. McManus allowing a First Amendment challenge to Maryland’s congressional districts to move forward. Separately, a three-judge federal district court panel rejected a motion to dismiss in Whitford v. Nichol, a case challenging Wisconsin’s state legislative Assembly districts. These cases challenging partisan gerrymanders have potentially significant consequences for fair democratic representation. Either could open the door to a ruling against political gerrymandering that leads to its demise.

The Supreme Court has long suggested there is a limit for what is acceptable partisan gerrymandering, but like obscenity, so far the line is undefined and left to courts to know it when they see it. The Court has said that it is willing to hear constitutional challenges to partisan gerrymandering, but existing legal theories have been insufficient to empower citizens and advocates with the tools they need to overturn partisan gerrymanders in court. Common Cause’s 2016 “Gerrymander Standard” Writing Competition is your chance to change that.

For the second year, we invite legal and social science practitioners, scholars, and students to submit papers that will identify partisan gerrymanders and distinguish them from districts drawn using neutral redistricting principles while developing legal theories or arguments that could be used by courts to declare partisan gerrymanders unconstitutional. This year, we are asking authors to focus specifically on the First Amendment issue in Shapiro and Whitford to demonstrate why the drawing of Maryland’s congressional districts or Wisconsin’s Assembly districts is a partisan gerrymander that should be condemned under the First Amendment. Winning papers are selected by a distinguished panel of democracy scholars. For contest updates, go to www.commoncause.org/gerrymanderstandard.

Winning Authors Receive:

  • Prize money: 1st place: $5,000, 2nd place: $3,000, 3rd place: $2,000
  • Publication in a leading academic journal
  • Payment of travel expenses to present papers at a national redistricting reform symposium

See submission requirements here.

Questions can be directed to Dan Vicuna at (213) 623-1216 or contest@commoncause.org.

LAPA Fellows Program 

The Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) at Princeton University invites outstanding faculty members of any discipline, independent scholars, lawyers, and judges to apply for visiting, residential appointments for the academic year 2016–2017. LAPA Fellows devote the major portion of their time to their own research and writing on law-related subjects of empirical, interpretive, doctrinal and/or normative significance.  In addition, LAPA Fellows are expected to be in residence for ten months and participate in LAPA programs, including a biweekly seminar, a weekly luncheon discussion group, as well as some public events and conferences. 

The Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) at Princeton University invites outstanding faculty members of any discipline, independent scholars, lawyers, and judges to apply for visiting, residential appointments for the academic year 2016–2017. LAPA Fellows devote the major portion of their time to their own research and writing on law-related subjects of empirical, interpretive, doctrinal and/or normative significance.  In addition, LAPA Fellows are expected to be in residence for ten months and participate in LAPA programs, including a biweekly seminar, a weekly luncheon discussion group, as well as some public events and conferences.  The program does not support, as a primary activity, off-site fieldwork or work in remote archives, development of course materials, work in legal practice, direct advocacy of causes or residence elsewhere. (For more information on LAPA, see http://lapa.princeton.edu/content/lapas-mission).

Fellows may apply to teach one course in Princeton’s graduate or undergraduate programs, subject to the needs of the University, sufficient enrollment, approval of the Dean of the Faculty, and the cooperation of the sponsoring academic department. One of the fellows, who will teach an undergraduate course, will be named the Martin and Kathleen Crane Fellow in Law and Public Affairs.

Fellowship applications must be submitted using the online application.

The deadline for submission is 5:00 PM (EST) NOVEMBER 16, 2015.  

Rebellious Lawyering At Twenty-Five, Call For Papers – Clinical Law Review

Abstracts due October 30, 2015. Visit http://rebelliouslawyeringinstitute.org/rebellious-lawyering-at-twenty-five-call-for-papers-clinical-law-review/ for more information.

Special Initiative to Promote Scholarly Activities in the Humanities

As part of the Year of the Humanities at Pitt, the Provost’s Office announces a special initiative to support significant and innovative scholarship in the humanities and creative arts. Individual or groups of T/TS faculty at all ranks in the Humanities at Pitt are invited to submit proposals for new scholarly projects or to advance existing efforts. Joint proposals with faculty outside the Humanities will be considered if a Humanities faculty member(s) is the lead scholar(s). Faculty members may apply for funds through this initiative and through the Central Research Development Fund in the same year for different research projects or extensions of the same project. Please note that requests by faculty members in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences to fund conferences in support of faculty scholarship may be more appropriately directed to the Faculty Research and Scholarship Program (FRSP) in the Dietrich School.

A proposal can request up to $20,000, but most will be funded at $5,000 or less. Funds may be used for research expenses as consistent with university policies, such as travel to archives, acquisition of materials, student research assistance, or technical support. Proposals that include hiring a Graduate Student Assistant (GSA) for a summer or term must include current year stipend rates (http://www.pitt.edu/~graduate/stipends.html) plus 50% fringe benefits. No funds may be used for faculty salary.

Proposals should contain a 5-page (maximum) narrative that describes the project and its contribution to scholarship, a 1-page detailed budget, a 1-page bibliography, current CV’s of all applicants, and a letter of support from the departmental chair(s). Proposals from department chairs should include a letter of support from the Associate Dean for Research. All application materials should be submitted as a single pdf document emailed to Mary Grace Murray mgwojnar@pitt.edu, assistant to Vice Provost Mark Redfern, by November 6, 2015.

Proposals will be reviewed and awards announced in December 2015. Funds can be expended from January 1 – December 31, 2016.

Hewlett International Grant Program 

Applications for the fall Hewlett International Grant Program are now being accepted by the University Center for International Studies. Small grants ($500 and $1,500) and large grants (up to $3,500) are designed to help Pitt faculty in the development or completion of international projects. The grants may be used for research, curriculum development, conference presentations, or development of publications.

The deadline for applications is Tuesday, September 15, 2015. Please visit www.ucis.pitt.edu/main/hewlett for the application form and procedure, as well as eligibility and funding priorities.  

Faculty eligible to submit a proposal include:

  • Full-time and part time tenure-stream
  • Tenured
  • Non tenure-stream, including lecturers and contract faculty

Applications are accepted from all schools and departments, centers, institutes and campuses at the University of Pittsburgh.

Researching Violence:
Practicing Gender and Gendering Practices

Dr. Kristin Anderson (Western Washington University)
Dr. Elizabeth Miller (Division Head, Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh)

Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 12-1:30pm
Lunch will be provided at 11:45 am
School of Social Work Conference Room, 2017 Cathedral of Learning
Free and Open to the Public

Sponsored by the Provost’s Integrative Social Science Research Initiative
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and Violence: Crossing Boundaries and Bridging Divides

Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting

New Orleans, Louisiana, June 2-5, 2016; Submission Deadline (abstract/summary): September 18, 2015

This is an invitation to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network (CRN) at the Law and Society Association (LSA) Annual Meeting in 2016.

Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: www.lawandsociety.org/NewOrleans2016/neworleans2016.html.

Within Law and Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities. We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.

A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject. Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a chair for the panel and a commentator for each individual paper. As a condition of participating as a panelist, you must also agree to serve as a chair or commentator for another panel or participant. We will of course take into account your scheduling and topic preferences to the degree possible.

The duties of a chair are to organize the panel logistically, including registering it online with the LSA, and moderating the panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before their upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for assigning commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter. The duties of a commentator are to read one paper and provide verbal comments as well as brief written (email is fine) comments.

If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please email an abstract or summary, along with your name and a title, to Jessica Clarke at jessicaclarke@umn.edu.  There is no need to upload the document to the TWEN site this year. Note that LSA is imposing a new requirement that your summary be at least 1,000 words long. Although a shorter summary will suffice for our purposes, you will be required to upload a 1,000 word summary in advance of LSA’s deadline on October 15. If you are already planning a LSA session with at least four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Jessica know.

In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion. If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please let us know. Please note that for roundtables, organizers are now required to provide a 500 word summary of the topic and the contributions they expect the proposed participants to make. Please also note that LSA rules limit you to participating only once as a paper panelist or roundtable participant.

Please submit all proposals by Friday, September 18. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. In the past, we have attempted to accommodate as many panelists as possible, but have been unable to accept all proposals. If we are unable to accept your proposal for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.

We hope you’ll join us in New Orleans to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.

Junior Faculty Call for Papers: Northeastern University School of Law Second Annual Legal Scholarship 4.0 Conference, Tackling the Urban Core Puzzle

Boston, Massachusetts, October 29-31, 2015; Submission deadline (abstract): August 31, 2015

Northeastern University School of Law’s second annual Legal Scholarship 4.0 conference will continue to explore the frontiers of applied theory by examining contemporary approaches to economic development in American cities and their often distressed urban cores. Even as American metropolises have begun to pull themselves out of the Great Recession, the neighborhoods at their cores generally remain underdeveloped and impoverished. They contribute significantly to the worsening inequality gap in the United States. They appear to be entrenched sites of market failure and economic distress. By examining a range of contemporary models aimed to improve worker participation, Financial services, property access, business competition and the development of business and personal assets and wealth, this conference will explore new connections between law and development in the urban core. Plenary speakers include Frank Pasquale (University of Maryland Carey School of Law), J. Phillip Thompson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture & Planning), Anthony Townsend (New York University, Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management), Scott Cummings (UCLA School of Law), Nestor Davidson (Fordham Law School) and Judith Scott (General Counsel to the Service Employees International Union).

The conference will advance the agenda of the Legal Scholarship 4.0 series at Northeastern University School of Law by focusing on two interrelated issues: audience and methodology. By engaging with scholars who use a range of methodologies, including qualitative empiricism, interdisciplinary collaboration and scholarship embedded in ongoing partnerships “in the Field,” we will explore new and developing models for applied theory that are intended to reach a broader range of audiences.

While Friday’s focus will be on urban development, the Saturday workshop will include works-in- progress by junior scholars exploring a range of substantive areas. Northeastern invites junior scholars (those who have spent 7 years or fewer as full-time law professors) to share their works- in-progress.

Breakout works-in-progress sessions will include a comment on each paper by senior faculty, and discussion by fellow panelists and conference participants. Conversations will continue throughout the conference at breakfast and lunch (provided), as well as during the speakers’ dinner. Interested junior faculty members are invited to submit an abstract (not to exceed 500 words) of the project they would like to present by August 31, 2015, to Professor Rashmi Dyal-Chand, r.dyal-chand@northeastern.edu. The chosen participants will be expected to submit completed paper drafts by September 9, 2015, and to participate in the entirety of the conference.

LatCrit-SALT Faculty Development Workshop and Conference

Doubletree by Hilton Hotel, Anaheim, Orange County, Calif., October 1, 2015 (Workshop) and October 2-3, 2015 (Conference)

The SALT/LatCrit Junior Faculty Development Workshop (FDW) is a one-day workshop sponsored by the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) and Latina/o Critical Legal Theory, Inc. (LatCrit).

The FDW will begin at approximately 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, October 1, 2015 and end that evening with an always fun community-building dinner.  The conference will be held in Orange County, California.  The LatCrit conference begins on Friday, October 2 and continues that weekend. 

The FDW is an engaging, relevant and useful event for progressive junior faculty and aspiring academics.  This year’s FDW will have excellent and inspiring participants discussing topics including: teaching critical values; executing progressive scholarship; law school austerity movements and progressive response; and a session on planning the next five years of your career.  The FDW will have many interactive components and serve as a great way to network with other junior faculty.   

More information about the LatCrit conference can be found here. As FDW is an affiliated part of the LatCrit conference, you need only register and pay for the LatCrit conference. There is no additional registration fee to attend FDW. Online registration for the events will be open soon!

AALS Section on Federal Courts: Annual Award for Best Untenured Article on the Law of Federal Jurisdiction
 

The AALS Section on Federal Courts is pleased to announce the fourth annual award for the best article on the law of federal jurisdiction by a full-time, untenured faculty member at an AALS member or affiliate school ­and to solicit nominations (including self-nominations) for the prize to be awarded at the 2016 AALS Annual Meeting in New York, N.Y. The purpose of the award program is to recognize outstanding scholarship in the field of federal courts by untenured faculty members.

To that end, eligible articles are those specifically in the field of Federal Courts that were published by a recognized journal during the 12-month period ending September 1, 2015 (date of actual publication determines eligibility). Eligible authors are those who, at the close of nominations (i.e., as of September 15, 2015), are untenured, full-time faculty members at AALS member or affiliate schools, and have not previously won the award.
 

Nominations (or questions about the award) should be directed to Tara Leigh Grove at William and Mary Law School (tlgrove@wm.edu). Without exception, all nominations must be received by 11:59 p.m. (EDT) on September 15, 2015. Nominations will be reviewed by a prize committee comprised of Professors Janet Cooper Alexander (Stanford), Tara Leigh Grove (William & Mary), Caleb Nelson (Virginia), Judith Resnik (Yale), and Amanda Tyler (Berkeley), with the result announced at the Federal Courts section program at the 2016 AALS Annual Meeting.

2016 New Voices In Civil Justice Scholarship Workshop Call For Papers

Vanderbilt Law School’s Branstetter Litigation & Dispute Resolution Program invites submissions for its 2016 New Voices in Civil Justice Scholarship Workshop, to be held May 23-24, 2016, at Vanderbilt Law School.

The Branstetter Program draws on a multimillion-dollar endowment to support research and curriculum in civil litigation and dispute resolution. Held annually, the Branstetter New Voices Workshop brings together junior scholars, senior scholars, and Vanderbilt faculty in the areas of civil justice. This year, three to four junior scholars will be selected via a blind review process to present at the New Voices Workshop.

The New Voices format maximizes collegial interaction and feedback. Paper authors do not deliver prepared “presentations.” Rather, all participants read the selected papers prior to the session, and at each workshop, a senior faculty member provides a brief overview and commentary on the paper. Open and interactive discussion immediately follows.
Submission requirements:

  1. Subject matter. Submitted papers should address an aspect of civil justice, broadly defined. Subject areas may include, but are not limited to, civil procedure, complex litigation, evidence, federal courts, judicial decision-making, alternative dispute resolution, remedies, and conflict of laws. In keeping with the intellectual breadth of the Branstetter Program faculty, the Workshop welcomes all scholarly methodologies, from traditional doctrinal analysis to quantitative or experimental approaches.
     
  2. Author qualifications. To be eligible to submit a paper, scholars must currently hold either a faculty position or a fellowship. We will consider co-authored papers.
     
  3. Format / Anonymity. We will consider preliminary drafts, drafts under submission, or accepted papers that will not be published before June 1, 2016. Papers should be formatted either in Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat. To maintain the anonymity of the process, please remove any self-identifying information from the submission.
     
  4. Deadline. Submissions should be e-mailed to Branstetter.Program@vanderbilt.edu no later than January 1, 2016. Please include your name, current position, and contact information in the e-mail accompanying the submission. We will contact you with our decision by February 15. Final drafts are due no later than April 22.

The Branstetter Program will pay all reasonable travel expenses within the United States for invited participants. Additional information can be found at http://law.vanderbilt.edu/newvoices. If you have any questions, please email Branstetter Program Director, Professor Tracey George (tracey.george@vanderbilt.edu).

Being Human: The Year of the Humanities in the University

The provost has named the academic year 2015-16 The Year of the Humanities in the University. The purpose of the year is to highlight the fundamental importance of humanistic thinking in research and education not only in humanities departments but also across the whole range of University schools and departments. The organizing committee invites faculty, staff, and students to submit proposals under the overarching theme, "Being Human."

We are inviting members of the many disciplines and professions of the University to reflect on how their work as scholars, teachers, and learners addresses what it is to be human. We're excited about exploring places where the humanities and other disciplines intersect and fostering new conversations among them.

We invite faculty, staff, and students from across the University to bring their knowledge and methods of inquiry to address the theme of Being Human by submitting proposals that address one or more of the following questions:

  • How can studying the arts and humanities improve creativity and innovation in other fields?
  • Many disciplines study aspects of human being. What aspects do they focus on? What do they have to say to one another?
  • Some disciplines study worlds other than the human. How do their inquiries engage in/with humanistic thinking?
  • How do the professions understand being human? What can the various professional schools learn from the humanities? What can the humanities learn from the professions?
  • How can the values, methods, and opportunities of the humanities be made visible, legible, and exciting to Pitt undergraduates, the Pittsburgh community, and the wider public?
  • What are the most urgent questions now for human beings/being human and how are the disciplines and professions at Pitt addressing them? How could they collaborate more fruitfully?

To support the Year of the Humanities in the University, the provost's office invites written requests for matching funds up to $5,000 to support events and programs that address these or related questions. Proposals should address the theme of the humanities in the University and bring together multiple schools or units. Proposals that aim to create a foundation for conversation that will extend beyond the academic year 2015-16 are particularly welcome.

Proposals will be accepted on a rolling basis beginning immediately, and should be submitted via the form available here.

Fulbright Scholars Program: Opportunities in Law

The Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program offers more than 200 awards around the world for American legal scholars to advance the study and use of law as a cornerstone for building mutual understanding between the people of the United States and people of other countries. Opportunities exist to guest lecture, conduct research, network and build collaboration across a wide range of legal fields. In addition, diverse grant opportunities are available for postdoctoral researchers, academics and professional applicants. Grant activity, length, invitation requirements, language requirements and qualifications vary by award, but a PhD or JD in law is generally required for most awards. See more at www.cies.org/opportunities-law

Global Studies Faculty Fellowship

The University of Pittsburgh Global Studies Center (GSC) announces a competition for its inaugural Faculty Fellow. Each year, GSC will select one outstanding University of Pittsburgh faculty member whose scholarship supports the Center’s research, curricular, and outreach priorities. This award is designed to advance and showcase faculty research related to GSC’s themes. The fellowship will provide up to $5,000 for travel, research, and curricular development and up to an additional $15,000 in support of a major scholarly event (e.g., workshop, conference, exhibition, performance, seminar, research collaboration; see guidelines below for some restrictions). More information is available at www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/facultyfellow


Faculty Funding Resources for International Research and Projects