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April 19, 2003

April 19 - This day at law
On April 19, 1967, John, Paul, George and Ringo - aka "The Beatles" - signed a partnership deed agreeing that the group would continue for a (further) period of ten years. When The Beatles split up prematurely in 1970, Paul applied to have the partnership terminated and a receiver appointed. Read a legal analysis of Paul McCartney’s 1970 lawsuit against John, George and Ringo.
4/19/2003 03:00:43 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 18, 2003

April 18 - Afternoon legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this afternoon's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/18/2003 04:54:20 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Saddam Hussein's violations of the Geneva Conventions
The Heritage Foundation has posted a memo detailing violations of the law of war by soldiers and operatives of Iraq's deposed Saddam Hussein regime.
4/18/2003 03:37:03 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 18 - Law school brief
UC Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall) has announced that political essayist, columnist and author Barbara Ehrenreich will be the guest speaker at Boalt's 2003 commencement ceremony.
4/18/2003 03:09:24 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Ashcroft on Iraq
A transcript of Attorney General John Ashcroft's remarks Thursday on the US Justice Department's Iraq-related terrorism prevention efforts is now available online from the Justice Department.
4/18/2003 03:01:02 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 18 - Morning legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this morning's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/18/2003 09:16:35 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 18 - This day at law
On April 18, 1958, treason charges against American poet Ezra Pound, first laid in 1943 in connection with his wartime broadcasts for the Italian Fascist government of Benito Mussolini, were dropped. Read Jonas Doberman, The Treason Debate: Ezra Pound and his Rome Radio Broadcasts[PDF].
4/18/2003 08:18:40 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 17, 2003

UNESCO seeks Security Council ban on trade in Iraqi artifacts
An emergency meeting of 30 international archaeological experts convened in Paris Thursday under the sponsorship of UNESCO has urgently recommended that a ban be placed on the trade of all cultural objects from Iraq, and has called upon Coalition powers to fulfill their obligations under international law to protect cultural property. The meeting issued the following statement:
The meeting deplores and is deeply shocked by the extensive damage to, and looting of the cultural heritage of Iraq caused by the recent conflict. It calls on the coalition forces to observe the principles of the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and its two Protocols.

The meeting agreed on the following recommendations to those responsible for civil order in Iraq:

1) That all museums, libraries, archives, monuments and sites in Iraq be guarded and secured immediately by the forces in place
2) That an immediate prohibition be placed on the export of all antiques, antiquities, works of art, books and archives from Iraq
3) That an immediate ban be placed on the international trade in objects of Iraqi cultural heritage
4) That a call be made for the voluntary and immediate return of cultural objects stolen or illicitly exported from Iraq
5) That there be an immediate fact-finding mission under UNESCO coordination to assess the extent of damage and loss to cultural property in Iraq
6) That there be the facilitation of international efforts in assisting cultural institutions in Iraq.
Addressing the meeting, UNESCO Director Koichirro Matsura announced his intention
to request the Secretary-General of the United Nations to submit the question of illicit traffic to the Security Council so that a resolution can be adopted which imposes an embargo, for a limited period, on the acquisition of all Iraqi cultural objects and calls for the return of such goods to Iraq if acquisitions or exports of this kind have already taken place.
UNESCO Assistant Director Mounir Bouchenaki said in a press conference afterwards that in the meantime UNESCO was evoking the 1970 Convention on the Illegal Traffic of Cultural Property, and was working with INTERPOL to recover items looted from Iraqi musuems. Read a UN summary of the press conference.

4/17/2003 05:40:49 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 17 - Afternoon legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this afternoon's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/17/2003 04:47:00 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Office of Electronic Government
The E-Government Act of 2002 took effect today, officially launching the White House Office of Electronic Government, headed by Mark Forman, a fomer e-business executive with IBM. For more on the US e-government strategies, see www.egov.gov/.
4/17/2003 04:15:29 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Judicial tourneys and Homeric precedent
In a new paper on SSRN, Stephen Choi (U.C. Berkeley) and Gaurang Gulati (Georgetown) propose - not entirely tongue in cheek - judicial tournaments among Court of Appeals judges where the reward to the winner is elevation to the Supreme Court. "Among the criteria that could be used are opinion publication rates, citations of opinions by other courts, citations by the Supreme Court, citations by academics, dissent rates, speed of disposition of cases, reversal rates by en banc panels and the Court, and so on." Loyola Law School's Lawrence Solum offers an extended analysis of this mad or brilliant or clever proposition.

Judicial competitions are not unprecedented. Homer's Iliad, purporting to describe Greek practice circa 1100 BC, describes a prize offered for good judging:
The town elders sat in a ring on chairs of polished stone,
the staves of clarion criers in their hands,
with which they sprang up each to speak in turn,
and in the middle were two golden measures
to be awarded to him whose argument
would be the most straightforward.
Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose?

4/17/2003 03:38:37 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 17 - Law school briefs
Former Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth Starr criticized the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law in a speech at Yale Law School Wednesday. The Yale Daily News reports.... The Harvard Law Record says that Harvard Law School is going to a new study abroad program which would allow students to take one semester at a premier legal institution in a foreign country.... Chief UN weapons inspector Dr. Hans Blix was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree last Friday at New England School of Law. NESL has more on his address.
4/17/2003 09:36:11 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 17 - Morning legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this morning's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/17/2003 09:27:27 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 17 - This day at law
On April 17, 1982, the Constitution Act 1982 was proclaimed in Ottawa, establishing the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and terminating the British Parliament's power to amend the Canadian constitution.
4/17/2003 07:56:34 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 16, 2003

April 16 - Afternoon legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this afternoon's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/16/2003 03:46:37 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Syria's UN ambassador on proposed WMD ban for the Middle East
Syria's UN ambassador spoke to reporters at the UN Wednesday afternoon on its proposed Security Council resolution to ban weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East. Watch recorded video from the United Nations.
4/16/2003 03:31:39 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Justice Breyer's Latin
Substance apart, Justice Breyer's translation of Cicero in his Monday New York speech leaves something to be desired:
The Constitution applies even in times of dire emergency. Who would think the contrary? Cicero did. He said inter armes leges silent -- "once the guns begin to sound, the laws fall silent."
Guns? In ancient Rome??

A law clerk should have caught that one....

4/16/2003 11:49:12 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Liberty, Security, and the Courts - Justice Stephen Breyer
Justice Stephen Breyer spoke Monday to the Association of the Bar of the City of New York on theme "Liberty, Security, and the Courts." Here's a brief excerpt of his speech, now online from the US Supreme Court:
The Constitution applies even in times of dire emergency. Who would think the contrary? Cicero did. He said inter armes leges silent -- "once the guns begin to sound, the laws fall silent." And Justice Jackson worried that the Court majority in Korematsu might have implicitly adopted Cicero's dictum. In dissent, Jackson warned the Court that wartime decisions could create disastrous precedents that would remain, like loaded guns, ready to be fired in the future.

But our Court, along with other modern courts, has explicitly denied Cicero's view. During the Civil War, the Supreme Court, in Ex parte Milligan, wrote that the Constitution does apply "in time of war as in time of peace." Indeed, in 1941, in the midst of hostilities, an English law lord, Lord Atkins, wrote that "the laws are not silent. Their substance may change, but they speak the same language." He added that England was engaged in a struggle for the right to maintain a government that would protect the liberties of its citizens. That objective demands that independent judges place themselves between government and citizen -- making certain that the government restricts liberty no more than the law permits.
Read the complete text of Justice Breyer's speech.

4/16/2003 11:40:51 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Terrorist threat level lowered
The Department of Homeland Security website indicates that the Threat Advisory level has been lowered from "High"(orange) to "Elevated"(yellow). Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge has issued a statement.
4/16/2003 11:27:07 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



EU accession treaty signing - webcast!
Wednesday marks the formal entry into the European Union of 10 new members: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia, and Slovakia. Review the EU Treaty of Accession to be signed today in Athens, and watch recorded video of the formal signing ceremony .
4/16/2003 10:37:03 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Responsibilities of the occupying powers in Iraq
Amnesty International issued a new briefing paper Wednesday on the legal responsibilities of the occupying powers in Iraq:
Despite appearances, the present situation is not a "legal vacuum". The forces of the USA and UK, as occupying powers under international law, have clear obligations to protect the Iraqi population. These obligations derive from international humanitarian law, which has long defined the rules on belligerent occupation, complemented by human rights law, which binds any state exercising jurisdiction or control over a territory. The USA and UK must fulfil their obligations and continue to do so for as long as they exercise military authority over Iraq....In this paper, Amnesty International focuses on the responsibilities of the USA and the UK as occupying powers to protect the fundamental rights of the Iraqi population. The paper outlines the international legal framework and sets out in some detail those obligations that appear most relevant to protect the rights of Iraqis. Specific recommendations are addressed to the USA and the UK.
Review the full AI briefing paper.

4/16/2003 10:28:42 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 16 - Law school briefs
The Fort Worth Star Telegram reports that Texas Wesleyan University School of Law is no longer for sale.... In a related development, North Texas University says that it plans to create its own law school after 2005.
4/16/2003 10:01:25 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 16 - Morning legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this morning's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/16/2003 09:56:27 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 16 - This day at law
On April 16, 1963, an incarcerated Martin Luther King, Jr. (arrested for demonstrating in defiance of a court order) wrote his Letter from Birmingham Jail in response to a published statement by eight fellow clergymen from Alabama :
We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God-given rights. The nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jetlike speed toward gaining political independence, but we stiff creep at horse-and-buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch counter. Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging dark of segregation to say, "Wait." But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; when you have seen hate-filled policemen curse, kick and even kill your black brothers and sisters; when you see the vast majority of your twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the midst of an affluent society; when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can't go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by developing an unconscious bitterness toward white people; when you have to concoct an answer for a five-year-old son who is asking: "Daddy, why do white people treat colored people so mean?"; when you take a cross-county drive and find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable corners of your automobile because no motel will accept you; when you are humiliated day in and day out by nagging signs reading "white" and "colored"; when your first name becomes "nigger," your middle name becomes "boy" (however old you are) and your last name becomes "John," and your wife and mother are never given the respected title "Mrs."; when you are harried by day and haunted by night by the fact that you are a Negro, living constantly at tiptoe stance, never quite knowing what to expect next, and are plagued with inner fears and outer resentments; when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of "nobodiness" then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of despair. I hope, sirs, you can understand our legitimate and unavoidable impatience.
Read the full text of the Letter.

4/16/2003 08:46:31 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 15, 2003

April 15 - Law school briefs
Athornia Steele has been named Interim Dean of Capital University Law School.... And in South Carolina, The State reports that alumni are worrying that the University of South Carolina School of Law is falling behind in the rankings.
4/15/2003 03:17:19 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 15 - Afternoon legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this afternoon's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/15/2003 02:40:07 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Rehnquist speech at U. Virginia Law School
Chief Justice William Rehnquist's speech last Friday at the University of Virginia School of Law is now online from the US Supreme Court. He said:
It is a special pleasure to deliver the Henry Abraham Lecture this evening. Before I went to law school I was a political science major, and at that time one of the recognized sub-specialties in political science was constitutional law. Political scientists have provided information and insights into the workings of the Supreme Court that complement books by lawyers on that subject. Legal academics tend to emphasize the legal doctrines, while political scientists tend to explore the workings of the system, and the people who man it. Henry Abraham's recent book Justices, Presidents and Senators is a splendid example of the latter type of work -- as he puts it in his preface, "a mini-history of the Supreme Court."

This evening I propose to give you a "mini mini" history of just one aspect of that institution -- the extra-judicial activities undertaken by various Supreme Court Justices. I am currently working on a book about the disputed election of 1876, in which Rutherford Hayes was the Republican candidate, and Samuel Tilden was the Democratic candidate. That election was, for practical purposes, resolved by an Electoral Commission created by Congress, which included ten members of Congress and five Supreme Court Justices. The service on this Commission by five members of the Court was probably as important an extra-judicial activity as has ever been undertaken by the Court's members. But in reading about it my curiosity was also aroused about other instances of such extra-judicial activity....
Read the full text of Chief Justice Rehnquist's speech.

4/15/2003 11:58:23 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Rule of law "paramount" for Iraq opposition leaders at US-sponsored meeting
US Central Command has just issued a pool report (follow-up now available here) from today's US-sponsored meeting of Iraqi opposition and exile leaders on the creation of an interim government and restoration of the rule of law in post-Saddam Iraq.


AFP photo pool

A 13-point statement was released at the end of the meeting:

1.Iraq must be democratic
2.The future government of Iraq should not be based on communal identity
3. A future government should be organized as a democratic federal system, but on the basis of countrywide consultation
4. The rule of law must be paramount
5. That Iraq must be built on respect for diversity including respect for the role of women.
6. The meeting discusses the role of religion in state and society.
7. The meeting discused the principle that Iraqis must choose their leaders, not have them imposed from outside.
8. That political violence must be rejected, and that Iraqis must immediately organize themselves for the task of reconstruction at both the local and national levels.
9. That Iraqis and the coalition must work together to tackle the immediate issues of restoring security and basic services
10. That the Baath party must be dissolved and its effects on society must be eliminated
11. That there should be an open dialogue with all national political groups to bring them into the process.
12. That the meeting condemns the looting that has taken place and the destruction of documents
13. The Iraqi participation in the Nasiriyah meeting voted that there should be another meeting in 10 days in a location to be determined with additional Iraqi participants and to discuss procedures for developing an Iraqi interim authority.
A photo gallery is also available.

4/15/2003 11:45:58 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Dealing in looted Iraqi antiquities is illegal
US Secretary of State Colin Powell issued a statement Tuesday warning Americans, Iraqis and others not to retain or attempt to buy and sell objects and documents taken from Iraq's national museums:
Objects and documents taken from museums and sites are the property of the Iraqi nation under Iraqi and international law. They are therefore stolen property, whether found in Iraq or other nations. Anyone knowingly possessing or dealing in such objects is committing a crime. Such individuals may be prosecuted under Iraqi law and under the United States National Stolen Property Act. The Iraqi people, as well as members of the Coalition forces and others, are warned not to handle these artifacts. In particular, Americans are asked not to purchase or otherwise trade in such objects as they belong to the nation of Iraq and are stolen property....

We are working through INTERPOL to pursue broader international law enforcement efforts to help locate these items and return them to Iraq before they make it into international crime channels.
Read the full transcript of Secretary Powell's statement, online from the State Department.

4/15/2003 09:38:56 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 15 - Morning legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this morning's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/15/2003 08:59:10 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 15 - This day at law
The Titanic sank early in the morning of April 15, 1912 after colliding with an iceberg in the North Atlantic. Of 2228 passengers and crewmembers aboard, only 705 survived. The sinking gave rise to a variety of lawsuits against the White Star Line, the Titanic's owners.
4/15/2003 08:54:33 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 14, 2003

April 14 - Evening legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this evening's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/14/2003 08:19:34 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



US fights unfairly in legal battles
US Supreme Court correspondent Tony Mauro offers a scathing assessment of American statements and legal strategies in the war against Iraq:
Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld offered the nation a remarkable civics lesson the other day. Asked about the widespread lawlessness, looting and anarchy racing through Iraq, Rumsfeld said, in effect, no big deal. "Freedom's untidy," Rumsfeld said. "And free people are free to make mistakes and commit crimes and do bad things."....

It's just the latest of Rumsfeld's boneheaded remarks about life and diplomacy and war that we've been treated to during his entertaining Pentagon briefings. But this riff was particularly misguided, because once again it shows a disregard for international law that, in the long run, jeopardizes the legitimacy of our war effort in Iraq.
Read his complete op-ed in Monday's USA Today.

4/14/2003 08:05:02 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 14 - Afternoon legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting stories making this afternoon's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/14/2003 03:30:05 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Moussaoui, unplugged
US District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema Monday ordered the Federal Public Defender's office to explain why, over two months after her order to the FPD to co-ordinate the "prompt installation" of hardware, software and connections for a private website that terrorist suspect Zacarias Moussaoui could use to review information from the discovery process associated with his expected trial, he did not yet have access to such a website. Read Judge Brinkema's order[PDF].
4/14/2003 01:51:43 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Columbia Law School - new website
Just in to JURIST: Columbia Law School has revamped its website. Same URL, but a brand-new look.
4/14/2003 01:38:38 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Justice for human rights abuses in Iraq
Amnesty International released a report Monday calling for the urgent establishment of a United Nations commission of experts to develop proposals for a program to address the issue of justice in Iraq, in close consultation with Iraqi civil society:
Amnesty International stresses that the UN has recognized expertise and authoritativeness in this field. As such, the UN should play the leading role in developing proposals for reforming the Iraqi criminal justice system and could recommend transitional and complementary approaches in the meantime, regardless of the arrangements made for governing Iraq.

"Proposals for using US or UK tribunals are undesirable, since they risk being perceived as victors' - justice. Certain proposals such as the use of US military commissions, which are not even courts, would be grossly unfair under international law," Amnesty International emphasized.

Possible transitional approaches under consideration include an international ad hoc tribunal and a mixed tribunal. Existing approaches including universal jurisdiction, could make an important contribution, and a regional tribunal should be examined. Amnesty International's report discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches under consideration.

Fundamental principles, drawn from international law, that must govern any approach to justice in Iraq include:

independence and impartiality: any tribunal must be truly independent from and pursue perpetrators solely on the basis of the evidence against them and through a fair process, in accordance with international standards for fair trial;
no selectivity: anyone suspected of having committed crimes in Iraq must be brought to justice, regardless of rank, nationality, or any other such ground;
no statute of limitations: grave abuses must be addressed regardless of when they occurred.
no amnesties: there should be no amnesties, pardons or similar measures for crimes under international law if such measures would prevent a conclusive verdict and full reparations for victims;
fair trials: suspects should be brought to justice in proceedings that fully respect international law and standards for fair trial at all stages of the proceedings;
no death penalty and torture: there should be no recourse to the death penalty or other form of cruel, inhuman or degrading punishment, whatever the circumstances;
reparation for victims: victims and their families must be accorded effective means to obtain full reparation for the violations they have suffered.

"Ensuring justice is fundamental for the countless victims of decades of grave violations of human rights by Iraqi government agents, as well as the victims of abuses committed by all parties in the course of several conflicts, including the ongoing war. In order to be fair and effective, all measures aimed at ensuring justice must be in full conformity with international human rights law and standards," Amnesty International said.
Read the full AI report Iraq: Ensuring justice for human rights abuses.

4/14/2003 12:43:53 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Local enforcement of immigration laws - ACLU complaint
The ACLU Monday filed a lawsuit seeking disclosure of a new Department of Justice policy granting local police unprecedented powers to enforce non-criminal immigration laws:
According to the Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, filed on behalf of a coalition of seven civil rights and immigrants’ rights groups, the Attorney General has adopted a new policy that allows state and local police to arrest and detain certain immigrants who are believed to be in violation of non-criminal provisions of the federal immigration laws. Despite repeated requests, the Department has refused to release the new policy or its legal basis to the public.

The groups said in legal papers that the Attorney General has overruled a 1996 Justice Department policy by issuing a legal opinion providing local police with new authority to enforce non-criminal immigration laws. According to the lawsuit, the change "would constitute a dramatic departure from prior policy and practice on an issue of national importance, with profound consequences for citizens and immigrants alike."....

In the past, dozens of local police officials and law enforcement organizations have spoken out against state and local participation in immigration enforcement, saying that it would jeopardize their relationships with immigrant communities and divert local law enforcement resources from the more important job of trying to control crimes against people. As Montgomery County (MD) Police Chief Charles Moose told a Washington radio station in May 2002: "This movement by the federal government to say that they want local officers to become INS agents is against the core values of community policing: partnerships, assisting people, and being there to solve problems."
Review the FOIA complaint [PDF].

4/14/2003 12:12:00 PM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Law.com - new and improved?
The Law.com commercial legal megasite, run by the American Lawyer Media conglomerate, launched a web site redesign Monday "created to provide you with improved access to an expanded network of sources for award-winning online news, information and resources, targeted to the needs of legal professionals." Was it worth it? Judge for yourself.
4/14/2003 10:59:16 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 14 - Law school briefs
Monday's issue of The Daily at the University of Washington reports that University of Washington School of Law dean W.H. Knight has taken the blame for providing erroneous information to US News & World Report that resulted in a significant drop in the school's latest ranking.... The Iowa City Press-Citizen notes that University of Iowa College of Law dean N. William Hines, the longest-serving current law school dean in the nation, is retiring at the end of the 2003-04 school year.... Chief Justice William Rehnquist spoke Friday to students at the University of Virginia Law School....Abroad, the Malaysian Daily Star reports that Baghdad University law professor Dr Raad Al Jidda has said that he is quitting teaching law for good in the wake of an American attack on his home in Al Adamia, Iraq: “I have studied all the theories of constitutional law and even written books on it but now I know these are just all great lies. There is no more law in the world. There is just the politics of guns and cowboys,” he is quoted as saying.
4/14/2003 10:30:10 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 14 - Morning legal news
Here's my academic pick of important and interesting articles making this morning's legal news: See JURIST's Legal News for updates.
4/14/2003 10:24:41 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



April 14 - This day at law
On April 14, 1775, Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Rush of Philadelphia helped organize the first American society for the abolition of slavery. Learn more about the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
4/14/2003 09:29:59 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST



Service interruption
Due to server problems in Pittsburgh, JURIST was down and unavailable over the weekend. Apologies for any inconvenience.
4/14/2003 09:17:09 AM by Bernard Hibbitts | link | latest Paper Chase | back to JURIST





The Paper Chase - Archives
Put a law professor on your website! Thanks to the magic of RSS, The Paper Chase is now available for websites as well as personal news aggregators. If you'd like to display up to 16 of The Paper Chase's latest posts on new law and learning in digest or headline-only form on your law school, law library, law firm or court website or intranet, or on your law-related weblog, e-mail JURIST@law.pitt.edu for permission and instructions. The service can be customized for size, color and font, is completely commercial-free, and is provided at no charge as an academic service to the community.

Hello, I'm Bernard Hibbitts, JURIST's Editor, blogger for JURIST's Paper Chase, and a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Join The Paper Chase for some real-time legal education as together we follow noteworthy new law, the latest in legal learning, and timely links to key online resources. Tips? Suggestions? E-mail JURIST@law.pitt.edu.



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Law is Fun
LawMeme
likeablindman
llm2003
Mike
Mixtape Marathon
Nathan Oman
Open and Notorious
Phil Carter
Prince Roy's Realm
The Rattler
Raymond Chandler
Rostam Marzban
Steven Wu
Sua Sponte
Tim Schnabel
Toby Stern
Unlearned Hand
Waddling Thunder
Zipsix

Pre-law students...
Adam Starr
Liable
Matt Stucky
So Sue Me

Australians...
Australian Legal Eye
House of Butter
Ken Parish
Kim Weatherall

Canadians...
Michael Girard

Germans...
disLEXia
Handakte WebLAWg
Lenz Blog

More law blogs...
Blawg
Blawgistan Times
CopyFight
Daily Whirl
Weblogs at Harvard
< ? law blogs # >

Basic blogs...
Doc Searls
EvHead
Junius
Mark Kleiman
Rebecca's Pocket
Talking Points Memo
Scripting News

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